Reviewing Fordlandia

Greg Grandin’s Fordlandia is reported to describe the rise and fall of Henry Ford’s Brazilian rubber plantation. In reality, Fordlandia is another striking example of the destruction and exploitation brought by capitalism.

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Reviewing The Last Trial

Scott Turow’s The Last Trial is billed as the final courtroom battle of 85-year-old defense lawyer Alejandro (Sandy) Stern. As a fan of Turow’s novels and Stern, who has appeared in all of them, I was conflicted as I began the book. While I recognize characters, like real people, must retire and even die, I kept thinking of how Sandy would go out and what would be next for the franchise.

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Reviewing the end of the Myth

Greg Grandin’s The end of the Myth: the frontier to the border wall in the mind of /America is the best look at the rise of so-called Trumpism I have read. Still, I think the book overcomplicates what is sadly too simple a reality.

Human nature is fundamentally selfish. Sure, there are people who don’t fall into the trap of selfishness, but most people are fundamentally selfish. The policies of nations, fueled by the rich and powerful, exploit the selfish, weak tendencies of most people to create societies based on division. As is hopefully obvious to most, by far the most common, brutal divisions stoked are race-based divisions. Throughout American history, The powerful have constantly stoke racial divisions, because a united people would reject the failed societies that give much to the few while forcing the rest to struggle.

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Reviewing the Deficit Myth

Stephanie Kelton’s The Deficit Myth is one of the most thought-provoking books I have read in years. Setting aside the fact that this reality indicates I’m a nerd, The Deficit Myth is an important contribution to our understanding of the economy and government’s involvement in the economy.

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