Reviewing the Price of Peace

The Price of Peace is Zachary Carter’s look at the life and ideas of economist John Maynard Keynes. While economics can often be a boring subject, I found The Price of Peace to be an important, educational read.

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Reviewing the Deficit Myth

Stephanie Kelton’s The Deficit Myth is one of the most thought-provoking books I have read in years. Setting aside the fact that this reality indicates I’m a nerd, The Deficit Myth is an important contribution to our understanding of the economy and government’s involvement in the economy.

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Andrew Yang’s Idea’s are stupid

I have been resisting writing this post for months. I kept telling myself Andrew Yang isn’t worth the trouble. But he keeps fooling too many. He distracts from important debate topics by smugly asserting nonsense. So, I can’t resist any longer.

Most people know the ever-increasing wealth gap between the rich and the poor in America is a huge, embarrassing problem. Demonstrating the stupidity of Yang’s ideas only requires us to agree on two things: anything that gives the wealthy more is stupid; anything that makes the rest of us pay more is stupid. With those agreements established, let’s look at Yang’s ideas.

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Reviewing Democracy in Chains

Nancy McLean’s Democracy in Chains should be read by anyone interested in understanding the radical right. Democracy in Chains highlights the complete lack of morality that exists within radical libertarians. The book chronicles their decades-long support for racism, voter suppression, and even murderous dictatorships. As Democracy in Chains makes clear: the radical libertarian movement cares about nothing beyond their ability to make money and control wealth. Everything from our lives to our government should be sacrificed so they can possess as much as possible.

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Reviewing The Color of Law

Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law is a great look at how the policies of the United States Government actively worked to segregate America. The Color of Law matters because it walks readers through laws, court opinions, and political decisions that forced America to segregate. The book also does a good job rebutting some of the arguments traditionally made in opposition to the reality that segregation was a choice made by racist and/or white supremacists to make unconstitutional segregation an American reality.

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WIC Explained

This is the first in a series of posts that will describe government benefits programs offered by the United States.

The next section will give basic details about the Women and Children’s Nutrition Program (WIC). The subsequent section will give facts about WIC participation.

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