News Updates for July 8,2019

This version of news updates has stories on adding a citizenship question to the census, pay for the women’s soccer team, the legality of the Affordable Care Act, and Iran enriching uranium.

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Consequences for Politicising our Lives

I need to make one thing clear: no one’s health insurance is in immediate jeopardy. Still, the Affordable Care Act is now facing its biggest threat. The possibility that 20 million insured Americans will lose their coverage is now real. There is a chance those with preexisting conditions will no longer have the opportunity to purchase coverage. Children under the age of 26 currently getting insurance from their parents’s policy could soon be uninsured.

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Democrats Will win the Senate

With voters going to the polls in less than 48 hours in one of the most important elections in American history, I thought I would try to predict some outcomes. The caveat here is that unreliable polling data, Republican voter suppression, and the unique interest in this election makes predicting results difficult. Still, I love politics and making what I hope are accurate guesses is fun.

I will make predictions in the most important Senate races being decided.

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John McCain Isn’t a Hero

Since John McCain’s passing on Saturday the tributes have been nearly constant from the right and the center. On the true left, the message has been mixed. McCain’s terrible foreign policy decisions (the war in Iraq) to name one have been criticized. Both groups are missing the point.

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Trump’s Health Care Executive Order Explained

The affect of Trump’s executive order won’t be felt for at least six months. The reason is that the Departments of Health and Human Services, Labor, and Treasury all need to change current regulations. In order to changed those regulations, the departments must follow the federal rule making process. This means there will be, at a minimum, a public comment period attached to the proposed changes. Since the typical insurance contract runs from January 1 to December 31, I don’t see the worst of the changes beginning until 2019.

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